Researchers Detect Healing In Antarctic Ozone Hole

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There has been mass panic across the globe since an ozone hole was discovered in Antarctica. However, it now seems that this panic can begin to subside as official researchers have been able to detect some healing going on in the hole.


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The healing is, of course, a very slow process, but has been happening since approximately 2010. Since this date, the ozone hole has reduced in size, shrinking down from a whopping 5 million square kilometres in size. Researchers have declared that this is down to the continual hard work on a global scale in an attempt to become a more environmentally friendly planet. However, the main source of the hole’s reduction is the decreased use of ozone hazardous chemicals.

With the ozone hole at such a large size, our planet was in serious danger, more at risk to serious diseases and conditions, such as skin cancer, as well as more general harm to both animals and humans alike, all due to extra exposure from the sun. The ozone layer protects us from the sun’s harsh, hot rays, and with it damaged, it can no longer do this for us.

The hole in Antarctica has been on the mend for some time now, and a large contributing factor to this was the banning of Chlorofluorocarbons at the beginning of the nineties. Thanks to this new lack of atmospheric chlorine, the ozone hole has shrunk by 4 million square kilometres. This is an impressive figure and one that we should continue to try and raise.

It’s not all good news, though. It could take as long as an additional 100 years to heal the ozone hole completely. Lingering chlorine in the atmosphere can take 50-100 years to decay fully so we may not see a complete resolution of the problem until at least 2050, if not later than this.

Some researchers disagree with this figure; some disagree with the entire idea of the hole healing itself at all. One thing is clear, though; the hard work the globe is putting in to rectifying the damage it has caused to the planet we call home is beginning to pay off, and that is absolutely wonderful to see.

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